AfterElton interview with “Doctor Who” Show Runner Steven Moffat
AfterElton: The first two episodes of this season with the Canton Delaware character were terrific. I love what you did with the character, and I wonder if you could talk about where the idea came from and sort of the genesis of it.
Steven Moffat: I wanted a sort of kick-ass American agent, but he’d have to be someone off-centered because he’d have to be good with the Doctor. Someone who would trust the Doctor more than the President, which is a weird thing. Well, two things. One, I wanted to find ways that he wasn’t your typical agent, and I wanted to really annoy Nixon. [laughs] And I thought that would do it.
But also someone pointed out to me [that] in the previous Doctor Who, the first one I had run, there were no gay or bisexual characters and I was sort of slightly appalled. I was thinking, I’m not like that at all. I would never have done that. So I was thinking, “Dammit, it’s the one criticism I’ve ever listened to. Good point, Doctor Who should always be…” It’s not because it’s politically and morally correct. It’s right forDoctor Who, isn’t it? It’s cheeky and off-centered. And fun.
AE: I’ve think you’ve done such a good job with all the different characters and representing the world the way it is. At some point, not having a gay character is like not having a black character. 
SM: Yeah. But you can’t be driven by that. I just think you should be open to it. It makes Canton more fun. The moment you hear that a whole other life just unfolds in your head.

AfterElton interview with “Doctor Who” Show Runner Steven Moffat

AfterElton: The first two episodes of this season with the Canton Delaware character were terrific. I love what you did with the character, and I wonder if you could talk about where the idea came from and sort of the genesis of it.

Steven Moffat: I wanted a sort of kick-ass American agent, but he’d have to be someone off-centered because he’d have to be good with the Doctor. Someone who would trust the Doctor more than the President, which is a weird thing. Well, two things. One, I wanted to find ways that he wasn’t your typical agent, and I wanted to really annoy Nixon. [laughs] And I thought that would do it.

But also someone pointed out to me [that] in the previous Doctor Who, the first one I had run, there were no gay or bisexual characters and I was sort of slightly appalled. I was thinking, I’m not like that at all. I would never have done that. So I was thinking, “Dammit, it’s the one criticism I’ve ever listened to. Good point, Doctor Who should always be…” It’s not because it’s politically and morally correct. It’s right forDoctor Who, isn’t it? It’s cheeky and off-centered. And fun.

AE: I’ve think you’ve done such a good job with all the different characters and representing the world the way it is. At some point, not having a gay character is like not having a black character. 

SM: Yeah. But you can’t be driven by that. I just think you should be open to it. It makes Canton more fun. The moment you hear that a whole other life just unfolds in your head.




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