"The Girl Who Waited" writer Tom MacRae on working with Russell T Davies and Steven Moffat

  • Digital Spy:
    Are there any big differences between working under Russell T Davies and Steven Moffat?
  • MacRae:
    I think the main difference between them is, Russell is very much about big, bombastic brush-strokes. It's a real thrill going through one of his stories and very emotionally elating. With Steven, those clockwork robots of his represent his brain, really. He's very much about the individual pieces clicking together. But that said, there's a huge crossover between the two, because 'Midnight' was very much a Moffat-y sort of script, and something like 'The Beast Below' was very much like a Russell script. So there's a big, shared common ground between them, and they're both fantastic. They have a slightly different approach, but both love the show and they're brilliant to work with. In that respect, it's not really very different at all.

I think Russell sees it as essential that every companion and the Doctor have a bit of a kiss of some description. It’s become a law of modern Doctor Who.

-David Tennant 

(via leslieknope-s)

A Companion To The Doctor’s Companions: Rose Tyler

It’s pretty clear now, that when Doctor Who came back after its enforced lay-off, the character on whom the production team’s hopes rested wasn’t so much the Doctor as his first companion. Get that right, and you’re back in the game. Get it wrong, and you might as well give up.
In terms of the Doctor and his role in proceedings, it’s close to business as usual. He flies around time and space, acts like he’s in charge, fixes things, saves the day, blows up the baddies, and whooshes off once more.
Whereas Rose – played by Billie Piper – is the converted sceptic, representing the waryWho audience, who want to believe but have been let down too many times in the past. She’s from an estate in London, lives a life which does not lend itself well to fantasies, does not know how to create made-up bombs, does not have a plummy accent and has clearly not come straight out of drama school. Rose Tyler is, if the term has any meaning for a TV show in which people can travel in time and space, real.

go read the rest at Anglophenia

A Companion To The Doctor’s Companions: Rose Tyler

It’s pretty clear now, that when Doctor Who came back after its enforced lay-off, the character on whom the production team’s hopes rested wasn’t so much the Doctor as his first companion. Get that right, and you’re back in the game. Get it wrong, and you might as well give up.

In terms of the Doctor and his role in proceedings, it’s close to business as usual. He flies around time and space, acts like he’s in charge, fixes things, saves the day, blows up the baddies, and whooshes off once more.

Whereas Rose – played by Billie Piper – is the converted sceptic, representing the waryWho audience, who want to believe but have been let down too many times in the past. She’s from an estate in London, lives a life which does not lend itself well to fantasies, does not know how to create made-up bombs, does not have a plummy accent and has clearly not come straight out of drama school. Rose Tyler is, if the term has any meaning for a TV show in which people can travel in time and space, real.

go read the rest at Anglophenia

The universe was lucky to have Sarah Jane Smith, the world was lucky to have Lis.

Russell T Davies

Rest in peace, Elisabeth Slader, our beloved Sarah Jane.

(via myothercarisatardis)




RSS Twitter YouTube Facebook BBC America

DOCTORWHO.TUMBLR.COM/ARCHIVE





IF YOU ARE NEW TO WHO, Check out these posts.



WONDERING WHERE TO WATCH?
Check out our guide.


DoctorWho_BBCA