Classic Who: An Unearthly Child

(Source: clarabosswald)

unwillingadventurer:

Another memorable and brilliant moment from An Unearthly Child.

Here’s the new cover + inside look at SFX Magazine.

Spoilers, obvs.

Details here.

the-fandoms-are-cool:

all-misty-eyed:


The TARDIS as seen on the first episode of Doctor Who, 1963.

New rule…first ever TARDIS Always reblog

ALWAYS reblog the moment of the Broken Chameleon Circuit

the-fandoms-are-cool:

all-misty-eyed:

The TARDIS as seen on the first episode of Doctor Who, 1963.

New rule…first ever TARDIS Always reblog

ALWAYS reblog the moment of the Broken Chameleon Circuit

(via ibelieveinher)

l-loveless:

Every Doctor Who story: 001 - An Unearthly Child (1963)

If you could touch the alien sand and hear the cry of strange birds and watch them wheel in another sky, would that satisfy you?

(Source: naomscampbell)

"Fear makes companions of us all."
Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child (1963)

"Fear makes companions of us all."

Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child (1963)

(Source: clara-oswald, via elevensameliapond)

Video: BFI ‘Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child’ Event

with Waris Hussein, William Russell, Carole Ann Ford, Mark Gatiss, and more.

(Source: youtube.com)

UKTV 50th Anniversary broadcasts continue in Australia, New Zealand

via DoctorWhoNews.net:

UKTV continues its season of classic Doctor Who stories today (13th) with the broadcast of The Aztecs at 4:30pm (Australia) and 4:20pm (New Zealand).The four-part adventure forms part of the channel’s celebration of the First Doctor this month, which kicked off last weekend with An Unearthly Child and continues with The Dalek Invasion of Earth next week (AU:3:30pm, NZ:3:15pm), rounding off with The War Machines on the 27th (AU:4:30pm, NZ:4:20pm).

The channel is showing stories every Sunday throughout the year in the lead-up to Doctor Who's 50th Anniversary in November, focussing on a Doctor a month. February is, as one might then expect, dedicated to the Second Doctor, featuring The Tomb of the Cybermen (3rd), The Dominators (10th), The Mind Robber (17th), and The Seeds of Death (24th).

All up-and-coming broadcasts from both 20th and 21st Century series of Doctor Who can be found via UKTV’s Doctor Who sections for Australia and New Zealand.

Radio Times Writeup of the BFI’s first ‘Doctor Who at 50’ Screening
Radio Times has a great writeup of this past Saturday’s all star panel to celebrate the First Doctor at BFI Southbank:


Saturday was a big day for Doctor Who – the programme and fans – as the British Film Institute launched Doctor Who at 50, its year-long celebration of the Time Lord. Every month they’ll be screening a classic story for each Doctor and reuniting many luminaries from the world of Who.
To kick off, it was right back to the very beginning, to An Unearthly Child, the atmospheric four-part serial that launched the series on BBCtv in November and December 1963. And it was amazing how many guests were able to attend, people directly involved on that programme or with the era of the first Doctor, William Hartnell. They included (pictured above) William Russell and Carole Ann Ford (companions Ian and Susan) and Jeremy Young, who played the first villain….


Click through to read the entire piece.

Radio Times Writeup of the BFI’s first ‘Doctor Who at 50’ Screening

Radio Times has a great writeup of this past Saturday’s all star panel to celebrate the First Doctor at BFI Southbank:

Saturday was a big day for Doctor Who – the programme and fans – as the British Film Institute launched Doctor Who at 50, its year-long celebration of the Time Lord. Every month they’ll be screening a classic story for each Doctor and reuniting many luminaries from the world of Who.

To kick off, it was right back to the very beginning, to An Unearthly Child, the atmospheric four-part serial that launched the series on BBCtv in November and December 1963. And it was amazing how many guests were able to attend, people directly involved on that programme or with the era of the first Doctor, William Hartnell. They included (pictured above) William Russell and Carole Ann Ford (companions Ian and Susan) and Jeremy Young, who played the first villain….

Click through to read the entire piece.

olga-korol:

23 November 1963Happy Birthday Doctor Who! 

olga-korol:

23 November 1963
Happy Birthday Doctor Who! 

My thoughts are, when I watch again, that it was really splendid work. Because the script and the production allowed us to act. And we had so much time and space to present the characters. It was all done in a great rush but I think it was quite an achievement. When I sit back and watch it now, I feel very pleased about it. It was a good piece of work, the acting was good and there was time somehow, and I think that’s a quality I really liked, because in a sense this kind of production allowed and awoke the imagination of the viewer. They could fill in where we didn’t have great special effects…but this allowed the imaginations to be stimulated and they had the time to get excited about it…and I think that was part of the success.
William Russell (Ian Chesterton) in the commentary for An Unearthly Child.

(Source: unwillingadventurer)

Holy crap, I just watched the first episode of Doctor Who… EVER!

kabutocub:

^_^ It was cool!

(Source: kabutocub)

unwillingadventurer:

“It all started as a mild curiosity in a junkyard…”

…Now it has become 49 years of an adventure.

Happy Birthday Doctor Who, 23rd November, 1963. 

becks28nz:

Happy 49th birthday Doctor Who!  -  original Radio Times feature and TV billing

Doctor Who: How It All Began—An Evening with Waris Hussein Tuesday night at The Paley Center for Media in NYC

If you’re in New York City, Waris Hussein, Director of the first episode of Doctor Who “An Unearthly Child” will take part in a screening, discussion, and Q&A about the very first episode of Doctor Who.

Doctor Who: How It All Began—An Evening with Waris Hussein

Tuesday, April 10, 2012
7:00 pm ET
New York

In Person

Waris Hussein, Director, “An Unearthly Child”
Moderator: Barnaby Edwards, President, Doctor Who New York

Climb into your TARDIS and travel back in time with us to November 23, 1963, to hear all about the making of “An Unearthly Child,” the very first Doctor Who episode ever aired, from the man who brought it to life, director Waris Hussein, who will recall what it was like being part of the creation of television’s longest-running science fiction series. In addition to a discussion and Q&A, the evening will include the screening of the episode, with live commentary provided by Hussein. After the event, the director will participate in an autograph session with attendees. (Autograph Policy: Waris will sign a personal item for $20 each. He will also have pictures available for signing at $20 each, which will be signed for free.)

Tickets on sale now.




RSS Twitter YouTube Facebook BBC America

BROWSE OUR ARCHIVE:
DOCTORWHO.TUMBLR.COM/ARCHIVE





IF YOU ARE NEW TO WHO, Check out these posts.

WONDERING WHERE TO WATCH?
Check out our guide.