aflawedfashion:

After listening to Moffat stating earnestly that the reason she saves him is to save the love of her life even if it comes at a great personal sacrifice, I don’t know how The Doctor could have said anything other than that he loves her.  

He’s a stranger to her but not only is he whispering his feelings in her ear, but he’s behaving as if he’s in love with her.  As much as Amy and Rory were good friends to her, this is a woman who was kidnapped and raised by monsters with a single mission in life — murder.  And here she is face to face with someone who is selflessly fighting for her when, from her perspective, he should have absolutely no reason to. He’s dying and all he’s trying to do is save her.  Help her. Teach her.  All this for no other reason than that he cares.  

How could anyone go through life knowing they have killed the love of their life?  So she saves him.  She’s choosing to believe that her fate is to love him rather than murder him.  Because up until this day, she believed she had no other choice.  Suddenly, she is seeing an entirely different future for herself and she knows the only way to save that future is to save him — the man who loves her and who she will love.  The complete opposite of everything she’s been conditioned to believe.

I just read the script the other night. I’d been putting it off for ages and ages, because once you read the last page, that’s it, the story is over. So I read 10 pages on the tube and I stopped, and then I picked it up again the other day and finished it. I was an absolute mess, an absolute wreck. But it’s good; it’s sad, but it’s what needs to happen. It’s perfect.
Jenna Coleman on the Eleventh Doctor’s final episode The Observer

The Guardian has a fantastic new interview with Jenna Coleman


Coleman does not come from a long line of performers. She was born in Blackpool (“a great place for a Doctor Who episode: it’s weird, quite romantic, but it’s not found what it’s supposed to be now”) and her dad – who has a business, with her brother, fitting the interiors of bars and shops – would watch her in school productions and wonder where the acting bug had come from. Aged 11, Coleman appeared as a bridesmaid in the musical Summer Holiday with Darren Day, and the singer gave her a Debenhams voucher as a thank you.

The Guardian has a fantastic new interview with Jenna Coleman

Coleman does not come from a long line of performers. She was born in Blackpool (“a great place for a Doctor Who episode: it’s weird, quite romantic, but it’s not found what it’s supposed to be now”) and her dad – who has a business, with her brother, fitting the interiors of bars and shops – would watch her in school productions and wonder where the acting bug had come from. Aged 11, Coleman appeared as a bridesmaid in the musical Summer Holiday with Darren Day, and the singer gave her a Debenhams voucher as a thank you.
It’s fantastic. I feel really spoilt to be honest and lucky to be in the show in the first place, but also to have come in at this time. Whilst we were filming it felt very celebratory and special. Working with David, Billie and John, I feel really pleased to be part of the whole thing.

Jenna Coleman on the 50th: ‘I feel really spoilt and lucky’

Click through to read the full interview (mild spoilers.)

EXCLUSIVE – Steven Moffat Talks John Hurt and The Day Of The Doctor

SFX has an exclusive interview with Steven Moffat about John Hurt’s time on set for The Day of The Doctor:

SFX: John Hurt is a huge piece of casting for the show. What does he bring to the mix?

Steven: “Well, you get to see John Hurt play the Doctor, which by any standards is incredibly cool.”

Click through for the interview (mildly spoilerish.)

Mark Gatiss: My love letter to Doctor Who - 50 years on - Telegraph


With 3D and cinema screening, the 50th anniversary episode of Doctor Who will be looking to the future. However, An Adventure in Space in Time, which will also be celebrating the show’s half-century, will dramatise its beginnings at the BBC.


Written by Sherlock and Doctor Who writer Mark Gatiss, An Adventure in Space and Time stars David Bradley as original Who actor William Hartnell and Jessica Raine as the show’s producer Verity Lambert. Steven Moffat, executive writer and producer behind Doctor Who, is also producing the one-off drama.


Gatiss, who is a life-long Doctor Who fan, said that he had wanted to tell the story behind the makings of Doctor Who and the people involved for years. An Adventure in Space and Time is his “love letter to Doctor Who”, he says, and he hopes that the fans, as well as Who rookies, will enjoy “the struggle of talented people (almost) accidentally creating a legend”.

Mark Gatiss: My love letter to Doctor Who - 50 years on - Telegraph

With 3D and cinema screening, the 50th anniversary episode of Doctor Who will be looking to the future. However, An Adventure in Space in Time, which will also be celebrating the show’s half-century, will dramatise its beginnings at the BBC.

Written by Sherlock and Doctor Who writer Mark Gatiss, An Adventure in Space and Time stars David Bradley as original Who actor William Hartnell and Jessica Raine as the show’s producer Verity Lambert. Steven Moffat, executive writer and producer behind Doctor Who, is also producing the one-off drama.

Gatiss, who is a life-long Doctor Who fan, said that he had wanted to tell the story behind the makings of Doctor Who and the people involved for years. An Adventure in Space and Time is his “love letter to Doctor Who”, he says, and he hopes that the fans, as well as Who rookies, will enjoy “the struggle of talented people (almost) accidentally creating a legend”.

Tennant on ponytails and Doctor Who

David and writer David Wolstencroft joined BBC Breakfast to talk about the programme but before they did, there was a small matter of David Tennant’s hair style that needed discussing.

(Click through for the video.)

Tennant on ponytails and Doctor Who

David and writer David Wolstencroft joined BBC Breakfast to talk about the programme but before they did, there was a small matter of David Tennant’s hair style that needed discussing.

(Click through for the video.)

They were having such a good time together that they brought that out. They get giggly with each other. It is, by lovely accident, a tremendous double-act.They’re naturally funny together. Enough alike and enough dissimilar. Matt said it was like Laurel and Laurel, as if Hardy didn’t show up.

Steven Moffat Talks about Matt and David on the set of The Day Of The Doctor

Warning: the rest of the quote is quite spoilery.

Why not a mayfly Doctor, who exists for one show only? I’d often thought about that. Would it be weird in the run of the series to have the 45th Doctor turn up and be played by Johnny Depp or someone? Would that be a cool thing to do? There was also the idea that if you could bring one classic Doctor back, you’d actually, impossibly, want it to be William Hartnell. You wouldn’t want any of the others. You’d want him to come and say ‘What in the name of God have I turned into?’ That’s the confrontation that you most want to see, to celebrate 50 years. Going round and round in circles on it I just thought ‘What about a Doctor that he never talks about?’ And what if it is a Doctor who’s done something terrible, who’s much deadlier and more serious, who represents that thing that is the undertow in both David and Matt. You know there’s a terrible old man inside them. Well, here he is, facing the children he becomes, as it were.
Steven Moffat Talks John Hurt’s Doctor

Here’s an inteview with Phillip Morris who found the missing Doctor Who episodes

Archive television recovery expert Phillip Morris, recalls how he found the film cans of The Enemy of the World and The Web of Fear sitting on a shelf, at a TV relay station in central Nigeria.

He goes on to explain how the prints - the largest single haul of episode returned since the junkings were halted - were part of the ‘bicycling’ system of sharing TV programmes between territories, and shares his fond childhood memories of Target’s Doctor Who novelisations. Stories that can now be seen on screen for the first time in decades…

(Source: youtube.com)

Rare video interview of the First Doctor discovered

A unique, rediscovered TV interview, showing First Doctor William Hartnell shortly after leaving Doctor Who, comes to DVD this month.
Hartnell was filmed for BBC regional news programme, Points West in his dressing room, as he prepared to perform in the pantomime Puss in Boots in Taunton.
When asked about the Daleks, Hartnell claimed that “They were difficult to play to, because you’re not looking into human eyes, you’re looking at a metal object.” He goes on to say he found this “distracting”.
And when pressed about his ability to shake off the association with Doctor Who and its extraordinary public popularity, Hartnell assuredly claims that he’ll do it by “by making a success in something else” because he’s “a legitimate character actor – of the theatre and film”.

The interview appears in the DVD release of Doctor Who: The Tenth Planet. Read the rest at DoctorWho.tv

Rare video interview of the First Doctor discovered

A unique, rediscovered TV interview, showing First Doctor William Hartnell shortly after leaving Doctor Who, comes to DVD this month.

Hartnell was filmed for BBC regional news programme, Points West in his dressing room, as he prepared to perform in the pantomime Puss in Boots in Taunton.

When asked about the Daleks, Hartnell claimed that “They were difficult to play to, because you’re not looking into human eyes, you’re looking at a metal object.” He goes on to say he found this “distracting”.

And when pressed about his ability to shake off the association with Doctor Who and its extraordinary public popularity, Hartnell assuredly claims that he’ll do it by “by making a success in something else” because he’s “a legitimate character actor – of the theatre and film”.

The interview appears in the DVD release of Doctor Who: The Tenth Planet. Read the rest at DoctorWho.tv

Shows reflect life and society. Things have changed and Doctor Who has changed, too. The companions today are there to challenge the Doctor, to contribute. They are intelligent, gutsy, strong, positive role models. Do I think there is room to change further? Yes. I’d love to see the Doctor be a woman one day, or a different ethnicity. It’s one of the major strengths of the show. The Doctor can be anything.
Freema Agyeman in Doctor who? The timelord’s companions since 2005 have their say | Television & radio | The Guardian
Part of me would have stayed doing it forever. But it’s one of those things where you just have to take a deep breath and think: ‘If I don’t leave this show now, people will resent me still being there in 25 years.’
Doctor Who: David Tennant revealed that it was hard to leave the role
The most important way that Doctor Who changed my life was that David became a good friend. We went on to work together in the theatre, and I recently saw him in Los Angeles. The Doctor Who love in the States is huge. More than anything I’ve done, it will live on – because the fans keep all things Doctor Who alive.
Catherine Tate in Doctor who? The timelord’s companions since 2005 have their say | Television & radio | The Guardian
I loved the character of Rose; the fact that she was a girl who went from a small, domestic life to experiencing time travel with this strange guy. She was both strong-willed and vulnerable. I think that’s a really healthy representation of women. Instead of showing a female character endlessly striving towards perfection, here we saw a range of genuine female reactions. The show seemed to say, it’s OK to cry, it’s OK to question yourself, and it’s OK to be excited about someone else coming up with a great idea.
Billie Piper in Doctor who? The timelord’s companions since 2005 have their say | Television & radio | The Guardian



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