BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Alex Kingston swaps the TARDIS for toil and trouble with Kenneth Branagh


Doctor Who star Alex Kingston will join Kenneth Branagh to play that famously bewitched couple the Macbeths.
The actors, who cut their theatrical teeth at the Royal Shakespeare Company, will lead the Manchester International Festival production of Macbeth, which will be performed in a deconsecrated church in the city centre, from July 5 for just a two-week run — though there will be a one-off live broadcast on July 20.
Alex often returns to the stage — she was in Michael Grandage’s production of Luisa Miller at the Donmar two years ago — but hasn’t been back to the Bard since playing Desdemona at the Birmingham Rep two decades ago.


via Mail Online

BAZ BAMIGBOYE: Alex Kingston swaps the TARDIS for toil and trouble with Kenneth Branagh

Doctor Who star Alex Kingston will join Kenneth Branagh to play that famously bewitched couple the Macbeths.

The actors, who cut their theatrical teeth at the Royal Shakespeare Company, will lead the Manchester International Festival production of Macbeth, which will be performed in a deconsecrated church in the city centre, from July 5 for just a two-week run — though there will be a one-off live broadcast on July 20.

Alex often returns to the stage — she was in Michael Grandage’s production of Luisa Miller at the Donmar two years ago — but hasn’t been back to the Bard since playing Desdemona at the Birmingham Rep two decades ago.

via Mail Online

‘Doctor Who’ Reigns in Manchester Theater Festival - NYTimes.com

By this point the adults on the adventure looked baffled. But the 8- and 9-year-olds had it all figured out.
The monster, duh, was one of the Weeping Angel statues that caused trouble last season on “Doctor Who,” the long-running science-fiction television series on the BBC that has become embedded in British popular culture. The Angels’ powers  include hurtling their prey into the past — hence the 113-year jump in  time. But what would come next, some of the students wondered aloud with  delight. Where would the story go from here?
Turning children into hands-on heroes of a “Doctor Who” episode, and  giving some of them their first taste of theater, are among the goals of  “The Crash of the Elysium,” which runs through Sunday in the Manchester International Festival here. The critically praised hourlong show is also the latest full-immersion work by the London  troupe Punchdrunk, best known in New York for another, continuing piece  of full-participation theater, “Sleep No More,” in which people — grown-ups, specifically — wander through a Chelsea warehouse watching scenes from “Macbeth.”

‘Doctor Who’ Reigns in Manchester Theater Festival - NYTimes.com

By this point the adults on the adventure looked baffled. But the 8- and 9-year-olds had it all figured out.

The monster, duh, was one of the Weeping Angel statues that caused trouble last season on “Doctor Who,” the long-running science-fiction television series on the BBC that has become embedded in British popular culture. The Angels’ powers include hurtling their prey into the past — hence the 113-year jump in time. But what would come next, some of the students wondered aloud with delight. Where would the story go from here?

Turning children into hands-on heroes of a “Doctor Who” episode, and giving some of them their first taste of theater, are among the goals of “The Crash of the Elysium,” which runs through Sunday in the Manchester International Festival here. The critically praised hourlong show is also the latest full-immersion work by the London troupe Punchdrunk, best known in New York for another, continuing piece of full-participation theater, “Sleep No More,” in which people — grown-ups, specifically — wander through a Chelsea warehouse watching scenes from “Macbeth.”




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