When Doctor Who references other things.

(Source: timelordsandladies)

2013 is a year where “big” science fiction properties are getting a lot of attention: There’s a new Star Trek movie. A much discussed and anticipated Star Wars movie is under development. And, most importantly, Doctor Who celebrates its 50th birthday. Yes, that’s right; I wrote “most importantly” because, when it comes down to it, Doctor Who is the best pop culture sci-fi around.

Sure, in terms of financial earnings or even just cultural awareness, Wars and Trek have the British time-travel series beat. Despite the show’s impressive growth with American audiences since its 2005 relaunch, most here would choose to fly in either the Millennium Falcon or the Enterprise over the TARDIS any day. But in terms of core concept, Doctor Who is filled with possibility in a way that few other science fictions can truly compare with.


Why Doctor Who is Pop Culture Sci-Fi At Its Best | TIME.com

Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” to be auctioned, expected to fetch $80m
21st-century-time-traveller:

Oooooh….an article (click through) about Munch’s “The Scream” being auctioned mentions the Silence….or does it? 

From the article:

While The Scream’s fame is undeniable, its ubiquity and widespread popularity are, at least on the surface, more difficult to explain.
An icon of misery and desperation makes for an unlikely decorative addition to the typical living room wall, after all.
 "I think this compulsion to look at things that trouble us is a fundamental part of the human condition. If you go to WH Smiths or Waterstones you find all these books on sale about abused children. The whole myth and industry around Vincent van Gogh is based on the same thing.”
Perhaps for this reason, The Scream’s influence on modern art has been considerable, as seen in Francis Bacon’s Screaming Popes series, Picasso’s Guernica and, of course, Andy Warhol’s silk prints of Munch’s work.
Popular culture has embraced the iconography, from the mask in Wes Craven’s Scream films to the Munch-inspired alien villains The Silence in Doctor Who. Munch himself was the first to produce this image in bulk, creating four versions - two paintings and two pastels - between 1893 and 1910, as well as a lithograph.

Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” to be auctioned, expected to fetch $80m

21st-century-time-traveller:

Oooooh….an article (click through) about Munch’s “The Scream” being auctioned mentions the Silence….or does it? 

From the article:

While The Scream’s fame is undeniable, its ubiquity and widespread popularity are, at least on the surface, more difficult to explain.

An icon of misery and desperation makes for an unlikely decorative addition to the typical living room wall, after all.

 "I think this compulsion to look at things that trouble us is a fundamental part of the human condition. If you go to WH Smiths or Waterstones you find all these books on sale about abused children. The whole myth and industry around Vincent van Gogh is based on the same thing.”

Perhaps for this reason, The Scream’s influence on modern art has been considerable, as seen in Francis Bacon’s Screaming Popes series, Picasso’s Guernica and, of course, Andy Warhol’s silk prints of Munch’s work.

Popular culture has embraced the iconography, from the mask in Wes Craven’s Scream films to the Munch-inspired alien villains The Silence in Doctor Who. Munch himself was the first to produce this image in bulk, creating four versions - two paintings and two pastels - between 1893 and 1910, as well as a lithograph.




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