shullieq said: Last night in Bio, I learned about Adipose and I was the only person in the entire class who was excited because I never knew Adipose was something outside of Doctor Who... I saw you under a microscope last night.

image

First of all, I need a few minutes to cry about how wonderful doctor...

constellations-through-time:

First of all, I need a few minutes to cry about how wonderful doctor who is, and the doctor who tumblr team. I don’t know who you are, but you people are AMAZING and i can never thank you guys enough for giving the fans the opportunity to have a Who&A!!!

Matt: A lot of people (myself included) say that doctor who has changed their life, by opening their mind to new possibilities and expanding their beliefs in what is possible within our universe. How has being on the show affected your beliefs about the world and the importance of humanity in all of time and space?

MATT: Yeah, it’s really encouraged an interest in science—genuinely—and thinking in a scientific way. I read a lot about Einstein, Richard Dawkins, and all that sort of stuff. And I love the idea and notion of time travel. I think it’s magic! It’s got me thinking about it a lot. And the morality of The Doctor is a great benchmark for anyone.

image

(Source: inkandpaperthoughts)

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.
Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.
It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.
"I make photographic time lines," Johnson says on his website. "Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world."

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.

Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.

It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.

"I make photographic time lines," Johnson says on his website. "Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world."

Neil deGrasse Tyson THE NERDIST: Sneak Peek Aug 4 BBC America

A lot of folks asked us, of all the astrophysicists in the world, why wasn’t Neil deGrasse Tyson scheduled to be in The Science of Doctor Who Special this weekend?

That’s because HE’S IN THE NERDIST TRIBUTE TO SCIENCE premiering the same night, just after ‘The Science of Doctor Who’!!!

Get an exclusive sneak peek at BBC America’s All New Special THE NERDIST: TRIBUTE TO SCIENCE before the World Premiere *** Saturday Aug 4 at 10/9c ***  and discover the long-rumored but never-before-confirmed connection between Thomas Edison… and Jay-Z?!

Here, Chris Hardwick sits down with celebrated astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and poses the question, “Are we still discovering shocking things?”

btw, also in the episode: Danica McKellar (mathematician, also ‘Winnie’ from The Wonder Years), Cara Santa Maria (Huffington Post’s “Talk Nerdy to Me”) and Bill Nye (The Science Guy.)

'The Science of Doctor Who' premieres Aug. 4 at 9/8c on BBC America followed immediately by 'The Nerdist Tribute to Science' at 10/9c

The Science of Doctor Who premieres August 4 at 9pm on BBC America and SPACE (in Canada)

BBC America is producing a new batch of Doctor Who specials this August and we’re excited about this one in particular. Why?

Only because they got some of our favorite physicists and scientists to talk about the “science” of Doctor Who, that’s why!!!!! ヽ(^。^)ノ

Think The Doctor’s Time Traveling is science-fiction… or science-fact? Find out in this exclusive sneak peek at BBC America’s All New Special THE SCIENCE OF DOCTOR WHO before the World Premiere *** Saturday Aug 4 at 9/8c *** only on BBC America. Immediately followed by the World Premiere of THE NERDIST: TRIBUTE TO SCIENCE at 10/9c.

Here, join DW Executive Producer and lead writer STEVEN MOFFAT plus big-time scientists like Theoretical Physicists MICHIO KAKU & JIM AL KHALILI and Space Scientist MAGGIE ADERIN POCOCK as they debate the possibility of time travel using Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity and wormholes.

Scientists Discover That Mars is Full of Water
winterinthetardis:

omg WHAT

• SmithsonianMag: Scientists Discover that Mars is Full of Water
• Doctor Who Series 4: The Waters of Mars

Scientists Discover That Mars is Full of Water

winterinthetardis:

omg WHAT

• SmithsonianMag: Scientists Discover that Mars is Full of Water

• Doctor Who Series 4: The Waters of Mars

(via ninurta-ekur)

Doctor Who's sonic screwdriver 'invented' at Dundee University

Scientists claim to have invented their own version of Doctor Who’s famous sonic screwdriver.

The Dundee University researchers have created a machine which uses ultrasound to lift and rotate a rubber disc floating in a cylinder of water.

It is said to be the first time ultrasound waves have been used to turn objects rather than simply push them.

The study could help make surgery using ultrasound techniques more precise, the physicists said.

Ultrasound waves could already be made to push objects and scientists believed they could also turn them - but the Dundee University team claims to have now proved it.

They used energy from an ultrasound array to form a beam that can both carry momentum to push away an object in its path and, by using a beam shaped like a helix or vortex, cause the object to rotate.

The results of the sonic screwdriver experiment will be published in the American Physical Society’s journal Physical Review Letters.

Engadget: Ultrasonic screwdriver sniffs out carbon fiber damage, planes book a check-up with The Doctor

By Mat Smith
…This sonic screwdriver is able to detect and visualize these invisible problems by bouncing sound off the plane’s surface and, well, it’s like that hammer test, but a heck of a lot more precise. The company hopes to ready the device for regular use by the end of next year.

(via xoxogigifoxhall)

Matt Smith & Karen Gillan Explain the Science of Cornflour Batter - The One Show - August 23, 2010 on BBC One

An oldie but goodie.

(Source: youtube.com)

HANDY devices like Doctor Who's sonic screwdriver are within reach, scientists say.

Organisers of the International Barcode of Life conference, in Adelaide this week, plan to use miniature DNA decoding devices to answer the question: “What species is that?”

Conference co-chair and director of the Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity at the University of Adelaide, Professor Andrew Lowe, says this is one of the most exciting developments in genomics.

"You point this thing at an alien species and it tells you all about it. That’s where we want to get to … maybe in five years, which is really neat."

By 2015 scientists expect to have a reference library of five million standardised DNA sequences they can use to identify 500,000 species, which is more than a quarter of all known species on Earth.

They would take a sample and then compare it with the sequences in the database, looking for a match.

The Worlds First Flying Sphere strikes a eerily similar resemblance to The Toclafane in Doctor Who

theunvanquishable:

 

Or maybe it’s just me, but I think we should all be a lil bit creeped out

http://gizmodo.com/5828098/the-worlds-first-flying-sphere-looks-like-an-alien-death-bot

(Source: sweetdelight-endlessnight)

'Doctor Who' Helps Shed Light on Phobias

Scientists wanted to analyze what details automatically most attract our attention. For instance, if there is a spider in the room, the most spider-fearing members of a group will likely be the first to point it out. Past research hinted this happens because our attention systems are hardwired to notice threats, but other research suggested that our attention is simply drawn to details we find most important personally.
To see which idea might be correct, behavioral psychologist Helena Purkis at the University of Queensland in Australia and her colleagues at the University of Sussex in England compared how much attention was paid not only to pictures of spiders, but also images taken from “Doctor Who” — pictures with presumably no survival relevance whatsoever. (Hint: The non-survival-relevant sci-fi series grabbed the attention of enthusiasts.)

'Doctor Who' Helps Shed Light on Phobias

Scientists wanted to analyze what details automatically most attract our attention. For instance, if there is a spider in the room, the most spider-fearing members of a group will likely be the first to point it out. Past research hinted this happens because our attention systems are hardwired to notice threats, but other research suggested that our attention is simply drawn to details we find most important personally.

To see which idea might be correct, behavioral psychologist Helena Purkis at the University of Queensland in Australia and her colleagues at the University of Sussex in England compared how much attention was paid not only to pictures of spiders, but also images taken from “Doctor Who” — pictures with presumably no survival relevance whatsoever. (Hint: The non-survival-relevant sci-fi series grabbed the attention of enthusiasts.)

Time travel is possible. Just ask the Samoans.

Samoa will jump forward in time by one day to make it easier to do business with Australia and New Zealand.

At present, Samoa is 21 hours behind Sydney. From 29 December it will be three hours ahead.

The change comes 119 years after Samoa moved in the opposite direction.

Then, it transferred to the east side of the international date line in an effort to aid trade with the US and Europe.

However, Australia and New Zealand have increasingly become Samoa’s biggest trading partners.

Samoan Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Malielegaoi said: “In doing business with New Zealand and Australia, we’re losing out on two working days a week.

“While it’s Friday here, it’s Saturday in New Zealand and when we’re at church Sunday, they’re already conducting business in Sydney and Brisbane.”

“While it’s Friday here, it’s Saturday in New Zealand and when we’re at church Sunday, they’re already conducting business in Sydney and Brisbane.”

(Source: travelstorytotell, via timemachinetales)

NASA Announces There Is A Space-Time Vortex Around Earth

Ah, now we know why the Doctor visits our planet so often. Via NASA’s website:

Einstein was right again. There is a space-time vortex around Earth, and its shape precisely matches the predictions of Einstein’s theory of gravity.

Researchers confirmed these points at a press conference today at NASA headquarters where they announced the long-awaited results of Gravity Probe B (GP-B).

“The space-time around Earth appears to be distorted just as general relativity predicts,” says Stanford University physicist Francis Everitt, principal investigator of the Gravity Probe B mission.

“This is an epic result,” adds Clifford Will of Washington University in St. Louis. An expert in Einstein’s theories, Will chairs an independent panel of the National Research Council set up by NASA in 1998 to monitor and review the results of Gravity Probe B. “One day,” he predicts, “this will be written up in textbooks as one of the classic experiments in the history of physics.”

Time and space, according to Einstein’s theories of relativity, are woven together, forming a four-dimensional fabric called “space-time.” The mass of Earth dimples this fabric, much like a heavy person sitting in the middle of a trampoline. Gravity, says Einstein, is simply the motion of objects following the curvaceous lines of the dimple.

Read More: NASA’s website

Carnegie Mellon releases a time machine...sort of.

killscreendaily:

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon have released a virtual time machine —  for pictures.  It’s a super-advanced time-lapse photo system that allows high resolution as well as viewing changes over time such as plants in boom.

“With GigaPan Time Machine, you can simultaneously explore space and time at extremely high resolutions,” said Illah Nourbakhsh, associate professor of robotics and head of the CREATE Lab. “Science has always been about narrowing your point of view — seeing a particular experiment or observation that you think might provide insight. But this system enables what we call exhaustive science, capturing huge amounts of data that can be explored in amazing ways.”

You can try it out here.

(via timemachinetales)




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