The Doctor Who Shut Up and Take My Money Link Of The Day: Tenth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Remote Announced
via Doctor Who tv: 



Following the huge popularity of the Eleventh Doctor range, The Wand Company have created an authentic Tenth Doctor Sonic Screwdriver Remote Control.
Painstakingly 3D scanned from the original screen-used prop, kindly loaned to The Wand Company by David Tennant himself, this Tenth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is a faithful clone, CNC machined from aluminium, crammed full of technology and is a fully functioning gesture-based universal remote control that looks, feels and works just like the real prop – utilising sound effects from the BBC archives.
Previewing on the ThinkGeek Booth at San Diego Comic-Con in July, the Tenth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Remote will be available exclusively through selected retailers in the UK, US and Australia in October 2013 to coincide with BBC Worldwide’s Tenth Doctor celebrations, here on doctorwho.tv. The Screwdriver will retail at £69.95 GBP / $109.95 USD / $129.95 AUD.
To further commemorate Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary year, The Wand Company is also launching a limited-edition gold and silver plated version of their enormously successful Eleventh Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Remote Control. A small quantity will be available first at San Diego Comic-Con, and then from other selected retailers in the UK and US, but with only 250 of these special, individually laser-numbered Sonic Screwdrivers ever being produced, this is the ultimate collectible for Doctor Who fans.



 

The Doctor Who Shut Up and Take My Money Link Of The Day: Tenth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Remote Announced

via Doctor Who tv

Following the huge popularity of the Eleventh Doctor range, The Wand Company have created an authentic Tenth Doctor Sonic Screwdriver Remote Control.

Painstakingly 3D scanned from the original screen-used prop, kindly loaned to The Wand Company by David Tennant himself, this Tenth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver is a faithful clone, CNC machined from aluminium, crammed full of technology and is a fully functioning gesture-based universal remote control that looks, feels and works just like the real prop – utilising sound effects from the BBC archives.

Previewing on the ThinkGeek Booth at San Diego Comic-Con in July, the Tenth Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Remote will be available exclusively through selected retailers in the UK, US and Australia in October 2013 to coincide with BBC Worldwide’s Tenth Doctor celebrations, here on doctorwho.tv. The Screwdriver will retail at £69.95 GBP / $109.95 USD / $129.95 AUD.

To further commemorate Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary year, The Wand Company is also launching a limited-edition gold and silver plated version of their enormously successful Eleventh Doctor’s Sonic Screwdriver Remote Control. A small quantity will be available first at San Diego Comic-Con, and then from other selected retailers in the UK and US, but with only 250 of these special, individually laser-numbered Sonic Screwdrivers ever being produced, this is the ultimate collectible for Doctor Who fans.
 

A bunch of Whovians have a Kickstarter project to put a TARDIS into orbit.

From their Kickstarter page:

We’re sending a TARDIS into space!

November 23, 2013 is the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who, and we’re extremely excited. So excited, in fact, that we almost don’t know what to do… almost. Actually, we know exactly what to do: We’ve built a replica TARDIS and we’re sending it into orbit. Yes, really! We’re not talking about sticking a little, plastic TARDIS on top of a model rocket and shooting it really high into the sky (although that would be wicked cool). And we’re not going to tie a TARDIS to a weather balloon (which, by the way would also be pretty flippin’ awesome). No, we’re putting a TARDIS into the payload bay of a real, actual, honest-to-goodness, rocket, and launching it into a Low Earth Orbit.

Low Earth Orbit is where satellites need to be to actually “orbit” the Earth, not just fall back down. So, we’re talking about sending this thing, really, really, high… space high. The international space station is in Low Earth Orbit. Seriously. The guys on the International Space Station will be able to look out their windows and say: “Check out that police call box floating by.”

The Shut Up And Take My Money Doctor Who Link Of The Day: TARDIS Speaker System with subwoofer
From the description:

The TARDIS Speaker is the only TARDIS speaker in the World, not even on Gallifrey do they have one! And It will be materialising near you very soon.
Awesome sound that you would expect from the Doctor. Magical features to give you the enjoyment of owning the only TARDIS speaker ever to be made.
With Bluetooth connectivity you can pair any smartphone or Tablet to this beautifully detailed manufactured speaker
With built in digital speakers and subwoofer it is definitely bigger on the inside! A quality of sound you could only expect from a highly technical Time Lord.


Note: we’re fairly certain that the TARDIS in the image above is not to size.
Price: £150.00 inc VAT

The Shut Up And Take My Money Doctor Who Link Of The Day: TARDIS Speaker System with subwoofer

From the description:

The TARDIS Speaker is the only TARDIS speaker in the World, not even on Gallifrey do they have one! And It will be materialising near you very soon.

Awesome sound that you would expect from the Doctor. Magical features to give you the enjoyment of owning the only TARDIS speaker ever to be made.

With Bluetooth connectivity you can pair any smartphone or Tablet to this beautifully detailed manufactured speaker

With built in digital speakers and subwoofer it is definitely bigger on the inside! A quality of sound you could only expect from a highly technical Time Lord.

Note: we’re fairly certain that the TARDIS in the image above is not to size.

Price: £150.00 inc VAT

hellolittlefish:

This augmented-reality TARDIS is really bigger on the inside!

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.
Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.
It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.
"I make photographic time lines," Johnson says on his website. "Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world."

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.

Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.

It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.

"I make photographic time lines," Johnson says on his website. "Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world."

Doctor Who's sonic screwdriver 'invented' at Dundee University

Scientists claim to have invented their own version of Doctor Who’s famous sonic screwdriver.

The Dundee University researchers have created a machine which uses ultrasound to lift and rotate a rubber disc floating in a cylinder of water.

It is said to be the first time ultrasound waves have been used to turn objects rather than simply push them.

The study could help make surgery using ultrasound techniques more precise, the physicists said.

Ultrasound waves could already be made to push objects and scientists believed they could also turn them - but the Dundee University team claims to have now proved it.

They used energy from an ultrasound array to form a beam that can both carry momentum to push away an object in its path and, by using a beam shaped like a helix or vortex, cause the object to rotate.

The results of the sonic screwdriver experiment will be published in the American Physical Society’s journal Physical Review Letters.




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