Time’s in flux, changing every second. Your cozy little world can be rewritten like that. Nothing is safe. Remember that. Nothing.

(Source: doctorwhogifs)

People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint - it’s more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly… time-y wimey… stuff.

Doctor Who Series 3: Blink

(via thedoctorsintrouble)

What is the best piece of advice you have ever received that you still use to this day?

i-absolutely-trust-him:

Matt: What is the best piece of advice you have ever received that you still use to this day?

MATT: “Time is an imposition on one’s dignity” —my father.

(Source: faithfulpond)

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.
Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.
It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.
"I make photographic time lines," Johnson says on his website. "Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world."

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.

Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.

It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.

"I make photographic time lines," Johnson says on his website. "Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world."

Time signatures
istolethebacon:

#doctorwho  (Taken with instagram)

Time signatures

istolethebacon:

#doctorwho (Taken with instagram)

Deconstructed Pocket Watches Look Like Gallifreyan

cross-sectionofthewhovian: Holy——. Suddenly Circlular Gallifreyan makes so much more sense!

something-doctor-who-related: I was thinking exactly the same!

meoplelikepeople: Gallifreeeeeeeeey
unicorn-fish: omg
pretendprism: woahhhhhhhhh
grrrbarrowman: I bet there’s a Time Lord in some other dimension looking at this picture and laughing hysterically at the dirty limerick it spells out
drivemytardis: Oh, I see, now it makes sense… Time lords… Aaaaaaaaw yeah.

Deconstructed Pocket Watches Look Like Gallifreyan

cross-sectionofthewhovian: Holy——. Suddenly Circlular Gallifreyan makes so much more sense!

something-doctor-who-related: I was thinking exactly the same!

meoplelikepeople: Gallifreeeeeeeeey

unicorn-fish: omg

pretendprism: woahhhhhhhhh

grrrbarrowman: I bet there’s a Time Lord in some other dimension looking at this picture and laughing hysterically at the dirty limerick it spells out

drivemytardis: Oh, I see, now it makes sense… Time lords… Aaaaaaaaw yeah.

The Doctor.

(Source: antlerguessa)

Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Time

10. A lifespan is a billion heartbeats. Complex organisms die. Sad though it is in individual cases, it’s a necessary part of the bigger picture; life pushes out the old to make way for the new. Remarkably, there exist simple scaling laws relating animal metabolism to body mass. Larger animals live longer; but they also metabolize slower, as manifested in slower heart rates. These effects cancel out, so that animals from shrews to blue whales have lifespans with just about equal number of heartbeats — about one and a half billion, if you simply must be precise. In that very real sense, all animal species experience “the same amount of time.”

- Another nine things over on the Discover Magazine blog


Q: But what if you’re a humanoid with two hearts?

Time travel is possible. Just ask the Samoans.

Samoa will jump forward in time by one day to make it easier to do business with Australia and New Zealand.

At present, Samoa is 21 hours behind Sydney. From 29 December it will be three hours ahead.

The change comes 119 years after Samoa moved in the opposite direction.

Then, it transferred to the east side of the international date line in an effort to aid trade with the US and Europe.

However, Australia and New Zealand have increasingly become Samoa’s biggest trading partners.

Samoan Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Malielegaoi said: “In doing business with New Zealand and Australia, we’re losing out on two working days a week.

“While it’s Friday here, it’s Saturday in New Zealand and when we’re at church Sunday, they’re already conducting business in Sydney and Brisbane.”

“While it’s Friday here, it’s Saturday in New Zealand and when we’re at church Sunday, they’re already conducting business in Sydney and Brisbane.”

(Source: travelstorytotell, via timemachinetales)




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