Video: BFI ‘Doctor Who: An Unearthly Child’ Event

with Waris Hussein, William Russell, Carole Ann Ford, Mark Gatiss, and more.

(Source: youtube.com)

Radio Times Writeup of the BFI’s first ‘Doctor Who at 50’ Screening
Radio Times has a great writeup of this past Saturday’s all star panel to celebrate the First Doctor at BFI Southbank:


Saturday was a big day for Doctor Who – the programme and fans – as the British Film Institute launched Doctor Who at 50, its year-long celebration of the Time Lord. Every month they’ll be screening a classic story for each Doctor and reuniting many luminaries from the world of Who.
To kick off, it was right back to the very beginning, to An Unearthly Child, the atmospheric four-part serial that launched the series on BBCtv in November and December 1963. And it was amazing how many guests were able to attend, people directly involved on that programme or with the era of the first Doctor, William Hartnell. They included (pictured above) William Russell and Carole Ann Ford (companions Ian and Susan) and Jeremy Young, who played the first villain….


Click through to read the entire piece.

Radio Times Writeup of the BFI’s first ‘Doctor Who at 50’ Screening

Radio Times has a great writeup of this past Saturday’s all star panel to celebrate the First Doctor at BFI Southbank:

Saturday was a big day for Doctor Who – the programme and fans – as the British Film Institute launched Doctor Who at 50, its year-long celebration of the Time Lord. Every month they’ll be screening a classic story for each Doctor and reuniting many luminaries from the world of Who.

To kick off, it was right back to the very beginning, to An Unearthly Child, the atmospheric four-part serial that launched the series on BBCtv in November and December 1963. And it was amazing how many guests were able to attend, people directly involved on that programme or with the era of the first Doctor, William Hartnell. They included (pictured above) William Russell and Carole Ann Ford (companions Ian and Susan) and Jeremy Young, who played the first villain….

Click through to read the entire piece.

My thoughts are, when I watch again, that it was really splendid work. Because the script and the production allowed us to act. And we had so much time and space to present the characters. It was all done in a great rush but I think it was quite an achievement. When I sit back and watch it now, I feel very pleased about it. It was a good piece of work, the acting was good and there was time somehow, and I think that’s a quality I really liked, because in a sense this kind of production allowed and awoke the imagination of the viewer. They could fill in where we didn’t have great special effects…but this allowed the imaginations to be stimulated and they had the time to get excited about it…and I think that was part of the success.
William Russell (Ian Chesterton) in the commentary for An Unearthly Child.

(Source: unwillingadventurer)

How an East Indian director, a Canadian film exec, and a young woman producer defied the odds to create Doctor Who
via supernaturalsaturday:

io9 has a great piece on the unlikely beginning to what would become one of the greatest television shows of all time:

These days, Doctor Who is approaching its 50th anniversary as one of the most successful television shows of all time. But originally? Doctor Who was a small show that the BBC expected to run for a few episodes, and then vanish forever. The show had a tiny studio and huge cameras, and a shoestring budget. But the people who were making the show were outsiders, who were anathema to the entrenched BBC culture.
At the Gallifrey One convention in Los Angeles, we were thrilled to hear from Waris Hussein, who directed the very first Doctor Who episode, about how an East Indian teamed up with a Canadian and a young woman to revolutionize television science fiction.
Hussein took part in a panel at Gallifrey about “Doctor Who in the Sixties,” alongside stars William Russell (Ian) and Maureen O’Brien (Vicki). And even though we kind of knew thatDoctor Who was an upstart program that many people within the BBC were opposed to, we didn’t realize quite how much the odds were against this show…

Please click through to read the rest.

How an East Indian director, a Canadian film exec, and a young woman producer defied the odds to create Doctor Who

via supernaturalsaturday:

io9 has a great piece on the unlikely beginning to what would become one of the greatest television shows of all time:

These days, Doctor Who is approaching its 50th anniversary as one of the most successful television shows of all time. But originally? Doctor Who was a small show that the BBC expected to run for a few episodes, and then vanish forever. The show had a tiny studio and huge cameras, and a shoestring budget. But the people who were making the show were outsiders, who were anathema to the entrenched BBC culture.

At the Gallifrey One convention in Los Angeles, we were thrilled to hear from Waris Hussein, who directed the very first Doctor Who episode, about how an East Indian teamed up with a Canadian and a young woman to revolutionize television science fiction.

Hussein took part in a panel at Gallifrey about “Doctor Who in the Sixties,” alongside stars William Russell (Ian) and Maureen O’Brien (Vicki). And even though we kind of knew thatDoctor Who was an upstart program that many people within the BBC were opposed to, we didn’t realize quite how much the odds were against this show…

Please click through to read the rest.




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